Genealogie Bos

This is my English-language Genealogy & Ancestry Blog.
(Mijn Nederlandstalige blog is genealogiebos.blogspot.nl).

19 Apr 2017

Wedding Wednesday - Everd Beij(e)ring married twice in Breukelen

Everardus Beij(e)ring was born in "Linkrik" in Tecklenburg, a county in Germany. In 1753 he was living in Breukelen, Utrecht, The Netherlands. He was 1st married in Breukelen on April 22, 1753, to  Maria van Steekelenburg. Maria was born and still living in Breukelen. Present at the marriage were Anna Margarita Beijring, Everardus' mother, and Peeter van Steekelenburg, Maria's father. 


Tecklenburg in Germany
Everardus Beijering was married a 2nd time, on May 8, 1763, in Breukelen, to Christiena Beek, a young girl, born in Venlo, but, at that time, living in Amsterdam.

Everardus had a daughter Jacomina Beijering. She was born in Breukelen, probably around 1755. Later, she had lived for a while in Amsterdam, likely after her father's remarriage. On November 24, 1776, Jacomina was married in Breukelen to Johannis Frowijn, who was both born and still living in Breukelen. 

3 Apr 2017

Mariner Monday – Arij Jans Verduijn (1694-1728)

Arij Janse Verduijn was a captain of the Dutch East India Company (V.O.C.) who transported goods from Batavia (nowadays Jakarta in Indonesia) to Holland. His parents were Jan Ariense Verduijn (†1736) and Maertje Pieters van Pavie (1660-1744). They had him baptised in Delfshaven near Rotterdam on September 10, 1694. Sponsors were Jan's brother Egbert Ariense Verduijn and his first wife.

Cape of Good Hope in South Africa
At the age of 17, on May 10, 1712, Arij Verduijn boarded the ship “Wassenaar” as a soldier. The ship departed from the island of Goeree in Holland, containing 138 sailors, 18 soldiers and a stowaway. For young Arij it may have been a reassurance that fellow townsman Jacob Verduijn was the ship’s captain.
A long-distance voyage was hard on the health of a sailing ship’s crew. During the first 2-3 months of the voyage newcomers aboard usually developed scurvy due to a lack of vitamin C. A prolonged calm could occur around the Equator, resulting in a trip of over 30 weeks. The ship “Wassenaar” took over half a year to reach the Cape of Good Hope, a rocky headland in South Africa that had been settled by the Dutch in 1652.

The ship with Arij Verduijn on board stayed for 24 days at the Cape before continuing its voyage to Batavia in Indonesia. Arij’s return voyage was with the ship “Voorburg”, sailing from Ceylon to Texel, where it arrived on September 13, 1714. In December Arij boarded ship again. This time he was third mate of Master Jakob van der Poel at a ship named “Nederhoven” with a tonnage of 600. The ship boarded the Cape in May 1715, and arrived in Batavia on July, 28. Arij returned with the ship “Voorburg”, arriving in Goeree on July 8, 1716. He had designated his parents as the beneficiaries of his salary. 


Voyage
Schip's name
Chamber
Job
Departure
Cape of Good Hope
Arrival
Outbound
Wassenaar
Delft
soldier
10-5-1712
19-11-1712 tot 13-12-1712
18-2-1713
Return
Voorburg
Amsterdam

1-3-1714
13-4-1714 tot 10-6-1714
13-9-1714
Outbound
Nederhoven
Delft
3rd mate
23-12-1714
30-4-1715 tot 24-5-1715
28-7-1715
Return
Voorburg
Delft

30-10-1715
11-1-1716 tot 1-4-1716
8-7-1716
Outbound
Den Dam
Delft
skipper
24-5-1723
7-9-1723 tot 24-9-1723
18-12-1723
Return
Den Dam
Delft
skipper
24-10-1725
22-1-1726 tot 28-2-1726
28-6-1726
Outbound
Alblasserdam
Delft
skipper
4-4-1727
5-8-1727 tot 22-8-1727
25-10-1727

Arij Jans Verduijn was married to Jacoba Borstius on November 5, 1719, in Rotterdam. She was baptised in Rotterdam on June 22, 1698, as posthumous daughter of Jacobus Borstius and Wijna van Riel. Her mother was married a second time in January 1699 to Abraham Hovendaal and had additional children.


The baptism of the eldest child of Arij and Jacoba, Jan, was on August 4, 1720, in Delfshaven. Sponsors were Arij’s sisters Jannetje and Ariaantje Verduijn. When their daughter Wijna was baptised on October 3, 1723, in Delfshaven, Arij Jans Verduijn was at sea.

On May 24, 1723, Arij Jans Verduijn had boarded the ship “Den Dam” as its captain. The ship had been build in 1716 in Delfshaven and had a tonnage of 600. His crew consisted of 104 seafarers and 47 soldiers. They visited the Cape of Good Hoop in September, arriving in Batavia on December 18. Boarding on October 24, 1725, Arij returned with his ship to Goeree in Holland, arriving on June 18, 1726. For this voyage, Arij had designated his wife, Jacoba Borstius, as the beneficiary of his salary.

28 Mar 2017

Frederijk Bos (1742-1811) in St. Petersburg

Vriezenveen is a small village near Almelo in Overijssel in The Netherlands. In the early 18th century in most people living in Vriezenveen earned a living as a farmer or farmer’s labourer. Some people travelled around, trying to sell seeds and linen. At first they travelled locally. Later they travelled through Germany and even to St. Petersburg in Russia. Some of those people settled in St. Petersburg, trying to make a living in Russia. Many of them specialised in the production of linen.

Among the first people from The Netherlands to settle in Russia was a Norwegian Dutchman, Cornelius Cruys (1657-1727). As a vice-admiral he organised the Russian Black Sea Fleet of Tsar Peter The Great. His son-in-law, Jean Lups (1667-1732), was the most important arms supplier in Russia, and also exporter of goods such as tar, leather and honey.

St. Petersburg turned out to be an excellent market, and more and more merchants left Vriezenveen to make the trip to St. Petersburg. One of those people was Frederijk Bos (1742-1811). He was a weaver who also instructed other people how to weave.

Frederijk Bos (1742-1811) was a son of Albert Albers Bos and Aeltjen Jansen. He married Klasijna de Vries on December 3, 1766, in Vriesenveen. She was a daughter of Berend Jansen de Vries and Valina Raphuijs. 
Frederijk and Klasijna had the following suviving children:
  1. Berendina van den Bos was bapt. on December 3, 1766, in Vriezenveen. She was married on April 15, 1792, in Vriezenveen to Albert Berkhof, son of Berent Berkhoff and Alken Wijghers. Berndina had several children before she died in Vriezenveen on December 24, 1825, aged 59.
  2. Aaltjen Bos was bapt. on January 23, 1774, in Vriezenveen, remained unmarried, and died in St. Petersburg in 1863.
  3. Valina Bos was bapt. on February 28, 1779, in Vriezenveen. She is the mother of Fedoria Kimovskii, and likely died in St. Petersburg at an unknown date. 
  4. Aalbert Bos was bapt. on March 17, 1782, in Vriezenveen.
  5. Adolf Bos was bapt. on December 16, 1787, in Vriezenveen.
St. Petersburg, Russia

Frederijk Bos is no relation of mine.
Sources: 

2 Mar 2017

Cornelis Nekeman died in 1717 in Denmark

Cornelis Cornelisz. Nekeman lived in Oost-Vlieland on an island to the North of Frisia in the Netherlands. He was born around 1660 to Cornelis Cornelisz. Nekeman senior and Aaltje Aalders. Around 1690 Cornelis the younger was married to a local girl named Neeltje, a daughter of Abel Kerstensz. and Annetje Cornelis. They had at least 4 children: Grietje, Cornelis, Abel and Claas.

Cornelis Nekeman was a sailor. He sailed from Amsterdam on June 29, 1704, with destination Dantzig (nowadays Gdansk in Poland). On December 16, 1705, he boarded the ship "Paarl" as sailing master. He is also mentioned as sailing master of the "Paarl" on April 15, 1706, and April 9, 1710. 

Cornelis Nekeman was a memmonite. The mennonites are a christian group belonging to a church community named after Menno Simons (1496–1561) of Frisia. Because of their commitment to pacifism, mennonite mariners had a preference for sailing the somewhat safe Baltic sea. 

On March 2, 1717, Cornelis Nekeman died due to "an unhealty body", while visiting Copenhagen in Denmark.

Copenhagen, Denmark, in 1728

Cornelis' son Abel grew up to be a sailor, too. In 1741 Abel Nekeman transported seeds from Riga in Letland to Amsterdam in The Netherlands. The next year he settled in Amsterdam. 

Sources: soundtoll registers, cpvanderlaan.nl, zeebrieven.

21 Feb 2017

Soldier Jacob Kleinjan (†1788)

A pink type ship
Jacob Kleinjan started working for the Dutch East India Company (V.O.C.) as a soldier in 1786. He departed on October 24, 1786, from Rammekens in Zeeland, The Netherlands. The ship, named “Juffrouw Johanna” (which can be translated as “Miss Joan”), was a pink type sailing ship with a flat bottom, a narrow stern at the back and a large cargo capacity. The ship's captain was Simon Koter and its crew consisted of over 170 men.
Since 1652 a Cape Colony had been established by the Dutch on the Cape Peninsula in South Africa. The “Juffrouw Johanna” arrived at its Cape Hope on February 22, 1787, staying there until March 19. On June 9, 1787, t he ship and its crew arrived at its destination, Batavia (nowadays known as Jakarta) on the island of Java in Indonesia.
Within a year of his arrival Jacob Kleinjan died in Asia on May 7, 1788.

13 Feb 2017

Ancestor Score 2017: 78% in the 10th generation

Inspired by the Ancestor Score of other blogs, I generated my own in february 2016. Shortly after posting it, I had to remove several wrong ancestors, decreasing my score. I shouldn't have worried for I found more than enough ancestors later in 2016 to compensate for the loss! 
New ancestors since my first Ancestor Score include the medieval Lords of Strijen, the De Beveren family in Dordrecht, Lauweris Querijnsz van Dijck, Aelbert Aerts Craeijenstein and Jasper van Cleef. The most common surnames among my ancestors are Van Driel, Oerlemans, Spruijt, Brand, Bos, Smits, De Jong and Van der Linden. 

Geneanet defines the Ancestor Score as 
comparing the number of possible ancestors with 
the number of identified ancestors on a 10-generation report”. 

My Ancestor Score at generation 10 in the period 1600-1722 is 77.9%. It will never reach the 100%, because some cousins intermarried in generation 7. Skipping those double ancestors, the actual number of missing ancestors in generation 10 is just 16%. The total number of my ancestors - starting with my parents (generation 2) - is now 4190.

Composition and Bandwidth of various Generations
Composition            
  Bandwidth *
Generation 
Men 
Women 
Total
% 2016
From 
Until 
3
2
2
4
100
100
1892
1906
4
4
4
8
100
100
1850
1880
5
8
8
16
100
100
1804
1857
6
16
16
32
100
100
1756
1832
7
30
30
60
93.8
93.8
1724
1802
8
58
58
116
90.6
90.6
1680
1777
9
112
111
223
87.1
86.7
1645
1749
10
203
196
399
77.9
76.4
1600
1722
11
318
296
614
60.0
57.0
1565
1695
12
405
348
753
36.8
33.8
1538
1695
13
405
298
703
17.2
15.7
1505
1645
14
330
219
549
6.70
6.1
1440
1625
15
187
101
288
1.76
1.6
1440
1580
16
97
63
160
0.49
0.5
1395
1540
17
62
27
89
0.14
0.1
1365
1485
18
37
19
56
0.04
0.0
1335
1470
19
31
8
39
0.01
0.0
1305
1440
20
15
7
22
0.00
0.0
1310
1385
21
13
7
20
0.00
0.0
1285
1345
22
10
4
14
0.00
0.0
1270
1320
23
6
3
9
0.00
0.0
1240
1290
24
2
3
4
0.00
0.0
1234
1234
25
2
1
3
0.00
0.0
1215
1215
  *) The Bandwidth of a generation is determined by the earliest and latest known birth or baptism date within that generation.